During my visit to Cincinnati earlier this month, I had the pleasure of meeting key people from Cintrifuse and a few of the regional accelerators. The website says Cintrifuse is "Where Dreamers, Disruptors and Doers Connect" because "the world needs innovation. Entrepreneurs, BigCos and Tech Funds need each other. An active network ensures they can connect. And at the heart of that network is Cintrifuse."

At Cintrifuse, I met with Wendy Lea, who has been CEO since 2014, and Eric Weissmann, director of Marketing. Lea is "an accomplished Silicon Valley executive with deep experience in marketing, sales, and customer experience."

Lea said, "Cintrifuse was born to answer this question: What will it take to create a thriving startup ecosystem in Cincinnati? Cintrifuse is a not-for-profit public/private partnership that exists to build a sustainable tech-based economy for the Greater Cincinnati region. Our purpose is to advocate for entrepreneurs leading high-growth tech startups– attracting, inspiring, and supporting them on their journey. The goal of Cintrifuse is to lower starting costs of business, especially businesses with the potential for high growth and that are disruptive technology. The Cincinnati Business Committee wanted to see how they could be relevant and formed Cintrifuse in partnership with the City of Cincinnati and EY. They wanted their kids to be able to come back to Cincinnati. The Cintrifuse Syndicate Fund is at $57 million and invests in VC firms outside of the region with the understanding they (VCs) create a regional engagement plan. There’s no stipulation that they invest in Cincinnati startups, but just be involved in the ecosystem. This includes reviewing deals, participating in events, and meeting our Limited Partners (LPs) most of whom they would love to meet with anyway - Procter & Gamble, Kroger, the University of Cincinnati, etc."

She said, "We own and manage a 38,000 sq. ft. building in the economic area known as "Over the Rhine." We got the building mortgage free, but put $17 million into improving the building. We opened in 2012. We provide services to 285 members companies – advisory services (such as mentoring and office hours), connections to talent, funding, and customers, as well as operating co-working space in downtown Cincinnati. We are part accelerator, part incubator, and part co-working space to move a company to the next 'Lily pad.’”

Lea added, "The 'headroom' at Cintrifuse is wide. There is a strong appetite for new technology, new ideas, and disruption. Cintrifuse is a census taker – 300 startups are on our database across industries. We have brought in $160 million into the region for their startups, and we give them lots of exposure to VCs. One of our success stories is Everything But the House, which started in Cincinnati. They just raised $41 million, and Cintrifuse made the introduction to their investors."

She explained, "Cincinnati has more Fortune 500 companies than anywhere else outside of San Francisco Bay area, so we created a Customer Connections program to share information between large companies and small companies. Our Customer Connections program is taking 15 startups to Israel to present ‘innovation briefs.’"

She would like to see Cintrifuse expand all over the world similar to TechStars in Boulder, Colo., which she was involved with when she lived in Boulder. She said, "Tech Star is the largest global network in the world with 28 centers, and their graduates have created 800 companies. Cintrifuse hosted their   reunion of graduates called FounderCon in the fall of 2016."

The next day, I met Jordan Vogel, now vice president of Talent Initiatives with the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce, who worked for Cintrifuse for three years as director of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. He gave me more background information on Cintrifuse, saying, "It was created by Cincinnati Business Committee, composed of the top 30 CEOs in the region and the Cincinnati Regional Business Committee, composed of about 100 CEOs of somewhat smaller companies. When Chiquita left, the leaders became concerned and asked ‘What does the future look like? What should it be?’ They decided they needed to promote the next P&Gs of the world. Entrepreneurship was the key. They commissioned McKinsey & Company to conduct a comprehensive study on what would make the Greater Cincinnati region more attractive to startup entrepreneurs and outside investment. The study revealed the region’s strengths and gaps. Cintrifuse was formed to leverage the strengths and fill in the gaps. There are four universities in the region, but there was no path to commercializing technologies being developed."

He added, "Funding was needed, so they created a fund of funds. They raised $78 million of which $57 million went into a syndicate fund. To be part of the syndicate, venture capitalists had to commit to take a look at startups and be committed to engage with two to four trips per year to the region to meet with entrepreneurs. The purpose was to create a food chain."